Remembering a beloved professor

Remembering+a+beloved+professor

Hannah Feakes

[media-credit name=”Photo courtesy of Quinnipiac University” align=”alignright” width=”200″]thumbnail_david-king[/media-credit]

David King, associate professor of law at Quinnipiac University, passed away on Nov. 15 after battling cancer, according to an email sent out by Jennifer Gerarda Brown, dean of the school of law.

King was among the leaders of the faculty who administered the transition of the law school from the University of Bridgeport to its affiliation with Quinnipiac in 1992. King was associate dean of the law school for 24 years. He was named interim dean of the law school from 2000 to 2002, according to Brown.

Brad Saxton, professor of law, worked with King on many occasions.

“For all of the years that I served as dean of the law school, I was very grateful for David’s terrific effectiveness as an administrator,” Saxton said. “For his hard work and dedication, for his knowledge, wisdom and good counsel and for his constant friendship and encouragement.”

King taught courses in property, land use and urban planning, as well as trusts and estates and real estate. He loved teaching law, and his passion for it and his students was clear to anyone who walked into his classroom, according to King’s obituary.

“He was a good friend, and I’ll miss him very much,” Saxton said. “He was also a terrific and dedicated teacher, knowledgeable, demanding and fair.”

Friends also remember David for his warmth and hospitality, according to his obituary. He loved to cook and he and his wife, Diane, always enjoyed making guests feel welcome in their home.

King was also very active in his local community. He was a board member of the New Haven Legal Assistance Association, a volunteer hearing officer for the Bridgeport and Norwalk housing authorities and a member of the editorial board of the Connecticut Law Tribune, according to his obituary.

David Nastri, a part time law student, took one of King’s property classes last fall. The two shared a special bond after finding similar connections to war. King shared stories with Nastri about his path to the war in Vietnam.

“If I could, I would give him the Crossed Rifles of my Infantry insignia, because if he thought they represented toughness, he deserved them more than I do,” Nastri said.

Nastri said that although King was noticeably getting weaker, day after day, he would always be in class.

“He quickly became dear to us as he fought to teach us in his very excellent way while fighting his [cancer] treatment at the same time,” Nastri said. “His only nod to how challenging that treatment was for him was to sit during some of his lectures.”

Fellow Tribune editors describe him as a respected colleague who had great writing ability and always offered thoughtful suggestions.

Saxton said King served extremely effectively for many years as associate dean and as interim dean.

“I would say that he was one of our most effective and beloved professors for all of his many years at the law school, including during the last years after he was diagnosed with cancer,” Saxton said. “All of us benefited from his knowledge, his wisdom, his organizational skills, his patience and his steadfast commitment to our students.”

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 11 at the School of Law Center. Donations in King’s memory can be made to the New Haven Legal Assistance Association.